Coronavirus and Older Adults: What Resources Are Available

Like many companies that work with older adults and college students in America, we’ve been watching the coronavirus situation as it evolves. We understand that COVID-19 could have vast impacts and we are taking current circumstances seriously. We are paying particular attention to the ways COVID-19 could affect the people we most often work with: students and senior communities.

You probably know that many colleges and universities have closed due to COVID-19. As you might imagine, this created a challenging situation for many students. In a previous blog, we highlighted some go-to resources specifically for college students. The main concern is that many students–especially international students–were asked to leave their on-campus housing and don’t have a place to go. Times of crisis remind us of just how critical it is to support one another during challenging periods. For this reason, we are so impressed by several of our homeowners who stepped up to help by offering rooms in their homes for displaced students. Thank you! 

At Odd Couples Housing, we do our best to put older generations and students at the heart of everything we do. Because of this, we want to make sure you are staying up to date on news about coronavirus. When it comes to the coronavirus, things have been changing quickly, and we want to make sure you are aware of your resources and prepared, in case it touches your community. Moreover, we want to share some coronavirus-related initiatives and a few tips to help you stay connected.

First and most importantly, please be sure to follow reliable sources that have up-to-date guidance such as the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) just to mention a few. We also encourage you to vigilantly follow guidelines from public health officials and to continue to monitor news from local authorities. A lot of experts are sharing information about COVID-19, so be sure to read their tips and advice on how people can protect themselves.

Secondly, we recommend that you consider using social media. Whether you’re a regular user or new to social media platforms, now is a great time to engage online. There are a lot of helpful social media platforms that have brought different groups of people together. You might try a Facebook group or app. Some pages and groups were created with the intention of sharing news updates, some are helping educate people, and some just want to connect people for socializing purposes. There are also pages that focus on local volunteer opportunities that you could use to both provide and receive support.

One great Facebook group matches people wanting to help others with those needing help during the coronavirus pandemic.  Although the page cannot guarantee that everyone’s needs will be met, it has “brought people together as a community and hopes that this allows positive things to happen.” Anyone needing help can fill out this form

Thirdly, since older adults have an increased risk of having serious COVID-19 related health concerns, (and some areas have stay-at-home orders) many people are concerned about going to the pharmacy to get medication. Thankfully, Walgreens and CVS have offered to deliver people’s prescriptions or complete essential online order with no delivery fee. Read more here. Furthermore, the two pharmacies mentioned above and Walmart will also loan their space for coronavirus tests.

Last but not least, it is understandable that those most at risk of contracting COVID-19 would be cautious about entering public spaces during this time. This makes it difficult to complete daily tasks, like buying food. Thankfully, many grocery store chains and other retailers have delivery options. Others are also setting aside certain hours exclusively for older adults to shop. The stores offering these special hours include Whole Foods, Target, Schnucks, and Dollar General, just to mention a few.

Lastly, here are just a few more resources for seniors in the  St.Louis area who might need meals, transportation, and any other help. If you need food but can’t afford it contact St.Louis Food Bank and St. Louis Area Agency on Aging. The St. Louis Area Agency on Aging does not just deliver meals but also provides transportation like Aging Ahead.

We also encourage you to take care of yourself and don’t become too isolated. Call a family member, email an old friend, or learn to text or video chat to stay in touch! Try to keep to your normal routine as much as possible, even if your activities have changed. This means keeping up with your usual wake-up, sleep, and mealtime routines. Also, challenge yourself to do some kind of movement every day. Staying connected, engaged and active can help you adjust to the many changes happening in the world.

In conclusion, we want you to know that there are resources available to support you during this challenging time. It is a weird time for all of us, but we are confident that we will get through this together! Our thoughts are with all of you and we hope you’re safe and healthy. Take care of yourselves and each other, and please don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any questions or concerns.

COVID-19 and College Students: Your Go-To Resources

Over the past week, we’ve seen significant changes in our day-to-day lives as a result of COVID-19, also known as the coronavirus. In our previous blog, we shared some information to help you learn and track COVID-19 cases. Today, we want to share some go-to resources specifically for college students.

Because Odd Couples Housing works with students, we’ve been thinking about the many young people whose lives and studies have been disrupted by the pandemic. This is no normal semester for many students. Colleges and universities across the country terminated study abroad programs, moved classes online, extended spring break, and in some cases, asked students not to return to campus. For many, this is a stressful time—financially, socially, and emotionally.

Because of this, we want to share some resources to make your life a little easier as you adjust to off-campus learning.

Stay in touch with your university!

First, remember that just because you don’t have a physical presence on campus doesn’t mean you shouldn’t stay connected. Check your email, be in touch with your academic advisor, student affairs and other university staff and join Facebook groups to stay in the loop. Your university might be able to offer options for financial aid and work-study, campus resources that might be available to you, and handling extenuating circumstances. Your university connections are a great place to start if you need extra support!

Storage Resources

Also, if you need a place to store your things while you’re in between campus and home, contact U-Haul. U-Haul is offering 30 days of free storage to college students who are displaced due to the virus.

Transportation Resources

Is transportation a stressor? If you’re going home and want to avoid trains, planes, and buses, consider Enterprise Car Rental. Enterprise is reducing the minimum age for car rental and waiving young renter fees for students through 5/31/2020.

Medication Resources

If you left medication in a dorm room you can no longer access, or if you’re uncomfortable going to the pharmacy to pick up medicine, there are affordable delivery options. CVS and Walgreens are both offering free prescription delivery.

Technological Resources

Importantly, we know that not all students who will be taking online classes have reliable internet connections off-campus. Many phone and internet companies are offering accommodations for people affected by the virus. These benefits include waived late fees, access to WiFi and hotspots, and suspending service termination for those impacted by COVID-19.

In short, we know it’s stressful to make a mid-semester change or be uncertain about your educational future. It’s natural to feel anxious during times of unpredictability and transition. Because of this, we recommend you take care of yourself as you settle into your semester. Facetime a friend, experiment with a new recipe, read a book you’ve had on your list, or try some of these strategies to help you cope!

Do you have any tips or tricks for students acclimating to a new kind of semester? Odd Couples Housing wants to hear from you—please share below!

Stay Up-To-Date With Coronavirus Updates

By now, you have probably heard about the Coronavirus (COVID-19), the virus that was first reported from Wuhan, China, on December 31st, 2019. According to the World Health Organization, as of March 5th, there have been more than 92,000 confirmed cases in dozens of countries and over 3,000 deaths. Countries across the globe are attempting to stop the spread of the coronavirus through quarantine and other public health interventions.

There are many fears and myths surrounding the coronavirus. Because Odd Couples Housing works with seniors and students from other countries, I thought it would be a good idea to share some reliable sources where you can educate yourself on COVID-19 and get live updates on what’s happening around the world.

World Health Organization

There is a significant amount of information about the COVID-19 outbreak on the World Health Organization website. The website also provides travel advice, guidance on protecting yourself, situation reports, and media resources that can be useful. In addition, the WHO website provides live updates on the virus. I recommend bookmarking and visiting this page for daily updates.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

If you are traveling or thinking of taking a trip, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) page has vital information about COVID-19 for travelers and travel-related industries. Learn more about how the CDC is responding to the coronavirus outbreak on their website. According to the website, they will share guidance and up-to-date information as it becomes available.

The Wall Street Journal

You might have many questions about the outbreak. Should I cancel my trip because of the coronavirus? Is there anything extra I should pack? How should I prepare my home and family? Are there other precautions I should take? The list goes on. Like most sites, the Wall Street Journal gives live updates on the outbreak. They also have a Q&A page for people worried about traveling right now and also it gives guidance on how to stay safe, what to avoid, and more.

The WorldoMeters

Another important page to pay attention to is Worldometer. In addition to reporting about coronavirus news, the site is also tracking the number of confirmed cases, recovered patients, and death toll by country.  What I like about this page is that it has live statistics. Below is a screenshot showcasing the number of cases as of March 3rd.

The New York Times

Another resource I’ve been looking at that might be interesting and I thought I should share with you is the New York Times. The New York Times has these interactive Coronavirus maps that are tracking the spread of the outbreak. As of today, the map shows, the disease has been detected in at least 83 countries which is twice as much it was two days ago. Below is a screenshot from Johns Hopkins University that the New York Times uses to track the spread of the virus.

<img src="mapscreenshot.png" alt="coronavirus tracking map from john hopkins university">

The Guardian.Com

Do you still have questions about the virus? Are you wondering what symptoms to look out for, how the virus spreads, or when it is time to call a doctor? If so, you might find the Guardian very helpful. On this page, you might find helpful information on how to protect yourself from the infection and live coverage updates. Stay safe.

Debunking The Generation Gap

Baby Boomers, you’ve probably heard a lot about the millennials. And millennials, I’m sure you’ve heard a thing or two about the Silent Generation. So, where did these generational delineations come from, and what about the stereotypes that accompany them?

The Generation Gap is defined as “differences of outlook or opinion between people of different generations.” It’s often used to explain perceived differentiation between people of varying ages and feeds some of the generalities made about the behaviors of people in different generations. It could help explain why you may get some skeptical looks when you bring up intergenerational living to your friends or family members! 

Take a look at the chart below to see where generations are commonly divided:

It’s easy to make assumptions about people based on when they were born. But, does our age define our opinions, talents, interests, and motivations? A study from the Cambridge University Press on intergenerational differences in the workplace says, not so much. In their words, “there is little solid empirical evidence supporting generationally based differences and almost no theory behind why such differences should even exist.” Simply put, you might have more in common with a differently-aged roommate than you think! 

Take technology use–this is a classic example of something that is often seen as a dividing force between generations. Millennials and Gen X-ers have a reputation for being too tech-dependent while Baby Boomers and the Silent Generation are seen as being out of touch with technological advances. However, a recent study from the Pew Research Center showed that that older generations are adopting technology at high rates. Nearly 70% of Baby Boomers have a smartphone! And just as interesting, while the rates of social media use have stayed steady for Millennials in the past several years, they have grown by at least 10% for both Baby Boomers and the Silent Generation. 

All this to say, the generation gap might not be so very big after all! If you’re thinking about ways to make connections with people of different age groups, intergenerational living could be a good fit for you. It’s a fantastic opportunity to get to know someone of different ages, debunk myths, learn a new perspective, and share what you know with another person!

Aging in the 21st Century: Challenge and Opportunity

Odd Couples Housing has the pleasure of working directly with Dr. Brian Carpenter, Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis.

Dr. Carpenter, whose research and teaching focuses on aging, has a pulse on the challenges and opportunities of an aging society. He offers new perspectives and raises important questions about the changes we’ll face in our homes, communities, and the national front, as the U.S. population grows increasingly silver. At Odd Couples Housing, we’ve learned much from Dr. Carpenter  to support our mission to create a sustainable future through inter-generational home sharing.

Recently, Dr. Carpenter recorded a brief Ted Talk style lecture that highlights key themes for those considering inter-generational living. We recommend you watch it. The graphics are particularly powerful. Below, we’ve summarized the main take-away from Dr. Carpenter’s talk and we’ve posed a few questions to help you think about our aging society.

Did you know the world’s population is aging? 

The number of adults over the age of 65 has grown steadily over the last 100 years, and it is expected to continue growing for the foreseeable future. As the baby boomer generation ages, we will see more and more people living into their later life. In fact, we are already seeing the demographic shift towards an older population, with expectations that the U.S. population over the age of 65 will double by 2060. Interestingly, the age group that is growing the fastest in terms of its proportion of the total population are our centenarians, or those over 100. 

How will this affect your own life, now and in the future?

What are the implications of an aging society?

In coming years, our population will begin to resemble the demographics of Florida, where approximately 20% of the population is over 65 years old. This shift towards an older demographic will impact many areas of our daily lives. It will affect health care, transportation, technology, finances, travel, leisure, culture, and of course, housing.

Where do you see indications that the U.S. is growing older?

What about Aging in Place?

Many older adults prefer to stay in their homes and communities as they age. While aging in place has many advantages, there are also challenges on many fronts.  Physical changes can impact mobility, cognition and ability to live independently. Financial changes can threaten a person’s ability to maintain a home. Changes in social networks might mean that a person is more isolated in their home.

Have you thought about where you or your loved ones would like to age? How will you plan to meet their needs?  

Why is remaining socially connected so important?

Staying connected to a social network or support system is vitally important for people throughout their lives.  As we grow older, the psychological benefits of social engagement are particularly powerful. Research indicates that strong social networks are associated with lower risk of depression and dementia, and higher life satisfaction. 

What do you do to stay connected to your friends and social networks?

How does inter-generational connection help?

Socializing with people across age groups is a vibrant form of social connection. Through inter-generational interactions, both younger and older people can learn new skills and perspectives that help to break down age-related stereotypes. When we spend time with different generations, we are more likely to engage with people as individuals, rather than lumping them into a trope or stereotyped category. 

How can you connect more frequently with individuals from another generation? 

If this has piqued your interest, Dr. Carpenter makes many more fascinating points about what it means to live in an aging society in his full talk. Consider setting aside ten minutes of your day to watch! 

What are the challenges and the opportunities we will face in years ahead in response to the aging of our population?

Four Tips to a Great Start with Your New Roommate

Living situations are important parts of our lives. Whether you are older, younger, moving into a new place, opening up your home, used to roommates, or sharing space with someone for the first time, it’s important to be comfortable in your home space. Settling in with a new roommate can be an exciting time–full of opportunities to connect with someone new–but it can also bring about a sense of apprehension about the unknown. What if things don’t go as smoothly as planned? What if I need a night to myself? Could we eat dinner together sometimes?