COVID-19 and College Students: Your Go-To Resources

Over the past week, we’ve seen significant changes in our day-to-day lives as a result of COVID-19, also known as the coronavirus. In our previous blog, we shared some information to help you learn and track COVID-19 cases. Today, we want to share some go-to resources specifically for college students.

Because Odd Couples Housing works with students, we’ve been thinking about the many young people whose lives and studies have been disrupted by the pandemic. This is no normal semester for many students. Colleges and universities across the country terminated study abroad programs, moved classes online, extended spring break, and in some cases, asked students not to return to campus. For many, this is a stressful time—financially, socially, and emotionally.

Because of this, we want to share some resources to make your life a little easier as you adjust to off-campus learning.

Stay in touch with your university!

First, remember that just because you don’t have a physical presence on campus doesn’t mean you shouldn’t stay connected. Check your email, be in touch with your academic advisor, student affairs and other university staff and join Facebook groups to stay in the loop. Your university might be able to offer options for financial aid and work-study, campus resources that might be available to you, and handling extenuating circumstances. Your university connections are a great place to start if you need extra support!

Storage Resources

Also, if you need a place to store your things while you’re in between campus and home, contact U-Haul. U-Haul is offering 30 days of free storage to college students who are displaced due to the virus.

Transportation Resources

Is transportation a stressor? If you’re going home and want to avoid trains, planes, and buses, consider Enterprise Car Rental. Enterprise is reducing the minimum age for car rental and waiving young renter fees for students through 5/31/2020.

Medication Resources

If you left medication in a dorm room you can no longer access, or if you’re uncomfortable going to the pharmacy to pick up medicine, there are affordable delivery options. CVS and Walgreens are both offering free prescription delivery.

Technological Resources

Importantly, we know that not all students who will be taking online classes have reliable internet connections off-campus. Many phone and internet companies are offering accommodations for people affected by the virus. These benefits include waived late fees, access to WiFi and hotspots, and suspending service termination for those impacted by COVID-19.

In short, we know it’s stressful to make a mid-semester change or be uncertain about your educational future. It’s natural to feel anxious during times of unpredictability and transition. Because of this, we recommend you take care of yourself as you settle into your semester. Facetime a friend, experiment with a new recipe, read a book you’ve had on your list, or try some of these strategies to help you cope!

Do you have any tips or tricks for students acclimating to a new kind of semester? Odd Couples Housing wants to hear from you—please share below!

Debunking The Generation Gap

Baby Boomers, you’ve probably heard a lot about the millennials. And millennials, I’m sure you’ve heard a thing or two about the Silent Generation. So, where did these generational delineations come from, and what about the stereotypes that accompany them?

The Generation Gap is defined as “differences of outlook or opinion between people of different generations.” It’s often used to explain perceived differentiation between people of varying ages and feeds some of the generalities made about the behaviors of people in different generations. It could help explain why you may get some skeptical looks when you bring up intergenerational living to your friends or family members! 

Take a look at the chart below to see where generations are commonly divided:

It’s easy to make assumptions about people based on when they were born. But, does our age define our opinions, talents, interests, and motivations? A study from the Cambridge University Press on intergenerational differences in the workplace says, not so much. In their words, “there is little solid empirical evidence supporting generationally based differences and almost no theory behind why such differences should even exist.” Simply put, you might have more in common with a differently-aged roommate than you think! 

Take technology use–this is a classic example of something that is often seen as a dividing force between generations. Millennials and Gen X-ers have a reputation for being too tech-dependent while Baby Boomers and the Silent Generation are seen as being out of touch with technological advances. However, a recent study from the Pew Research Center showed that that older generations are adopting technology at high rates. Nearly 70% of Baby Boomers have a smartphone! And just as interesting, while the rates of social media use have stayed steady for Millennials in the past several years, they have grown by at least 10% for both Baby Boomers and the Silent Generation. 

All this to say, the generation gap might not be so very big after all! If you’re thinking about ways to make connections with people of different age groups, intergenerational living could be a good fit for you. It’s a fantastic opportunity to get to know someone of different ages, debunk myths, learn a new perspective, and share what you know with another person!

Happy Housing Anniversary!

If you’ve been following Odd Couples Housing, you probably recognize Nagesh and Sally. They were one of the first matches that we set up and have shared their experiences on STLMade (link) and the Ladue News (link) (any others?). Sally is a retired Associate Dean of Communications at Webster University and loves spending time with her cuddly boxer, Tank. Nagesh is a current graduate student at Webster where he is busy earning two Master’s degrees. 

October 23rd marked the one year anniversary of Sally and Nagesh becoming roommates. We caught up with the pair about the past year and what the Odd Couples Housing match has meant to them. 

“I got so lucky,” Sally said, “It’s been very smooth. It’s very win-win.” Nagesh is originally from Mumbai and Sally noted that some of the favorite things she has learned from him are related to Indian food and Nagesh’s keen cooking abilities. Aside from learning about Nagesh and Indian food, Sally has also learned some things about herself in the past year. Most salient? “Learn to let go. I don’t have to be a parent.”

Nagesh was also effusive in his description of the past year with Sally and expressed gratitude for the opportunity to share her home. Living with her helped him feel settled in St. Louis, focus on school, and most importantly, “find a home away from home.” 

When asked about what year two will hold for the pair, Sally sighs. Nagesh will be graduating soon and most likely leave the St. Louis area. She will be sad when he moves out, but made it clear that she is ready for the next young person Odd Couples Housing sends her way!

And Sally’s advice for new roommate pairs?

“Live and let live–acceptance is key. You teach me and I’ll teach you.”


Living with a Roommate Who Works from Home

For some, the days of packing a lunch, getting dressed up, and going to work are long gone. Whether it’s every day or occasionally, at least 43% of American spend some time working remotely each year. Despite being fairly common, many people are not familiar with this new work structure. If your new roommate works from home, you may be wondering, “What does this mean for me?”